Friday, March 6, 2020

Sweet Magnolia

Oil on Panel, 4 x 4 inches

     This is a painting of a female Magnolia Warbler. 
     Last night, while watching the news, I noticed a flying insect rise from the lampshade across the room. My immediate thought? It was heading my way to bite me. Deciding against running out of the room screaming after losing sight of its location, my second thought turned to springtime and the thawing out of everything. 
     Living in Duluth, Minnesota, I generally don’t see a single insect for a good five months, minus the occasional spider that crawls out of the woodwork every now and then. For that reason, late fall and winter are my favorite times of the year. And with two feet of snow still on the ground, one would think insects would be hanging on hard to winter. But like it or not, they’re starting to emerge. 
      Last week, the first larder beetle of the year made its appearance in my kitchen. Grrrr, I’m not a fan. Generally, it's the biting kind that I don't care for, but warblers, such as this Magnolia Warbler, primarily feed on insects. They need insects to survive. Sounds simple enough. Okay, sure, I love bugs, just as long as they stay away from me. I envy entomologists. If there ever was a profession that is completely opposite of what I’d ever be, it might be that. With every bug I see from now on this spring, I’m going to say out loud (or maybe to myself if there are other people around), “I love you, little bug.” But if it bites me, just remember. Love is a fickle thing. 
     With spring on the cusp of arrival, three cheers to the warbler migration. They’re coming!! Bottoms up everyone. Let the insect feast begin!

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